Bloggery Love with @pastelwasteland

Earlier this month, Rob Ulitski contacted me for an interview for his website,  Pastel Wasteland. Considering this is a site dedicated to showcasing and supporting creative talent as well as being a production company in the UK... how could I say no? I LOVE talking about being an artist in this industry. I find the conversation so interesting. Rob is the creative director and I defiantly feel like one of my fellow humans who loves exploring this side of what it means to be and thrive as a creative in the modern world.

We chat about balancing so many projects as an artist... which is something I get asked about all the time. To be honest, I juggle all these projects the same way everyone juggles their life... I just don't have the same amount of commitments apart from work that most people my age do. I'm sure once those commitments grow for me, I will take myself away from projects that don't mean as much to me as they used to do. But I like to always have something to do (even if thats binge watching a new Netflix series) and I love what I'm getting up to the past couple of years! 

Rob also asked about my main influences and the seemingly effortless transition between styles of makeup. I find that a curious question as maybe the current makeup industry climate has trained the rest of the world how to only see Makeup Artists with one style, forgetting the versatility we ACTUALLY have. Or is this question a product of so many people really only leading with their 'signature style' out of feeling like thats what we are 'supposed to do'. 

I wonder.

One question I loved answering, because so many artists think I'm rolling around in piles of cash and opportunity in a makeup utopia was: 

PW- In this kind of economy and industry, it can be tough to feel like you’re moving forwards sometimes. How do you battle these feelings when they come up, and do you have any advice to other people who might be struggling in a similar way?

It's really great to be able to incorporate into an open conversation the things from MUA Bootcamp that I actually practice. 'Practice what you preach' isn't that what they say? Yesterday Trish posted up on Facebook (in her words) a 'rant'... this was posted in my private Facebook group exclusively for artists who have completed MUA Bootcamp with me. In Bootcamp... we talk A LOT about dreaming who you want to be as an artist... and then in your day to day, what you can do to actually go out and make those things a reality. It's an ongoing conversation that is really useful. So I think Trish was making a valid point considering so many of the group want to be published in magazines such as Laud. I thanked Trish for this... as it really opened up a rabbit hole of comments and communication. As artists, I think we stand in our own way WAY TOO OFTEN... and we wait for all our ducks to line up and everything to be perfect before we go for it.

Here's what Trish wrote:

 Thanks to Trish for her permission to repost this outside of my forum x

Thanks to Trish for her permission to repost this outside of my forum x

Considering the reason for the FB group and what we all explore during MUA Bootcamp... I think this was so valid! We created LAUD to celebrate our talent in Australia... yet so much of our talent still doesn't think they're good enough and don't reach out! Little do you all know... that the only ones who get published are the ones who just reach out. 

I don't know ANY other publisher who is takes the time to give feedback like Trish does... so even if you aren't a Bootcamper... what's stopping you except yourself? We don't need submissions... but this was all out of love and wondering "...if all these artists only want to get published... why aren't they doing anything about it?"

In the interest of protecting the groups privacy in conversation which is something that I think is very important, I can't publish what was said in the forum, however here were my replies:

 I'd like to clarify... I was talking about the submissions from people who haven't understood our aesthetic. Some submissions are all fashion with no hair or makeup... sometimes not even a face! Clear they don't understand what Lauds about. One in particular was such beautiful photography... however you never saw the models face and the hair was brushed, at most. Not a suitable shoot for a hair and beauty focussed mag. If you go to laudmagazine.com.au there's actually a submissions page with everything you need to know xx

I'd like to clarify... I was talking about the submissions from people who haven't understood our aesthetic. Some submissions are all fashion with no hair or makeup... sometimes not even a face! Clear they don't understand what Lauds about. One in particular was such beautiful photography... however you never saw the models face and the hair was brushed, at most. Not a suitable shoot for a hair and beauty focussed mag. If you go to laudmagazine.com.au there's actually a submissions page with everything you need to know xx

trish3.JPG

In saying that... I'll soon be writing more about Laud and the upcoming tips for this years Face2Face Awards.

CLICK HERE to read my interview with @pastelwasteland !!